02 April 2009

Cameos of a lighthouse # 4

I wonder about the mind that came up with the design of the prism, to magnify the light. Aside from its functionality, it is a work of art.


Then onto the top balcony, with the original railings. The view is magnificent, but on a really windy day you could easily be blown off.

11 comments:

shabby girl said...

I'm sure it wasn't easy being one of those that had to man a lighthouse back in the day!
Hearty soul.

Pat - Arkansas said...

I've been away for a while so have spent some minutes looking back at the last week of your posts. I very much enjoyed your Lighthouse Cameos; fantastic photos! My knees and calf muscles are worn out from just contemplating climbing all those stairs. The view from the top is magnificent, but I can't imagine being out there during a gale, as the lighthouse keeper undoubtedly was at some time.

bodaat said...

Wow, that view...I can only imagine what it must have been like to soak in all of that beauty.

Firefly said...

Your study of the St Francis lighthouse of the last couple of days have been very interesting. I have to say I'm now looking forward to out trip to St Francis even more. I want to do my own lighthouse study. See if I can get different photos from the ones you took.

Drew said...

really cool

Old Wom Tigley said...

Shine I light Max this is a great post..

Tom

Cheesy said...

I am in awe of those lenses~

Katney said...

Those lighthouse lenses really are amazing, aren't they?

Anna said...

Max-e great minds to create something like that. BTW you have a good Easter weekend. Anna :)

TallTchr said...

Look no further--the mind belonged to Augustin-Jean Fresnel. We theatre people know him well for inventing the Fresnel lens which, on a spotlight, uses concentric ridges to focus light to the center of where it's pointed but then feathers it outwards. Very flattering for aging divas, but he's saved even more ships than acting careers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fresnel

Jeanne said...

I was realyl keen to go up to the top when we were there over Easter, but with an 87-year old father and a 6-year old nephew with vertigo in tow, it did not seem like a practical idea!! Next time. Love your studies of the lens.